FOLLOW US

Unretiring Retire Your Ride — Not Cash For Clunkers

By/Par Gideon Scanlon

Government can improve both the industry and the environment

With the slow return to normal life after months of social isolation, American and Canadian politicians will soon turn their head to another problem—a sluggish economy. What role the automotive aftermarket will play in this remains to be seen.

In making their policy decisions, lawmakers should turn to the history books. It is to be hoped that, in their studies, they pay attention to the different approaches taken by the American and Canadian governments in their efforts to use the auto recycling sector to help kick-start the economy during its last major upheaval.

During the world’s last major economic downturn, the United States developed policies designed to incentivize the scrapping of older vehicles. The approach paid out massive premiums to anyone wanting to buy a new vehicle and they were not overly concerned with what happened to the older vehicle that was turned in.

In contrast, the Canadian Government adopted a number of policies designed to reduce vehicle emissions and if that happened to stimulate the economy, that was a side benefit. Thus was born the National Vehicle Scrappage Program, branded as Retire Your Ride.

The Canadian program paid a modest premium to drivers who sold functional, older vehicles to accredited auto recyclers. By the time it ended in 2011, more than 100,000 older, environmentally damaging vehicles had been taken off Canada’s roads—far more than even the most optimistic Government predictions.

Of course, the program also accelerated the transformation of the Canadian auto recycling industry, which had been moving from a disorganized industry with immense variation in standards and practices, into the more professionalized sector it is today. Only those recyclers trained in and audited for their acceptance of the National Code of Practice regarding environmental best practices in auto recycling benefitted from the program during its run.

In contrast, the Canadian Government adopted a number of policies designed to reduce vehicle emissions and if that happened to stimulate the economy, that was a side benefit. Thus, was born the National Vehicle Scrappage Program, branded as Retire Your Ride. Unlike the U.S., the Canadian government has adopted a number of policies to reduce vehicle emissions and, in order to stimulate the economy, this was a secondary benefit. The result was the national vehicle scrappage program called “Retire Your Ride”.

En revanche, le gouvernement canadien a adopté un certain nombre de politiques visant à réduire les émissions des véhicules et, si cela a stimulé l’économie, c’était un avantage secondaire. Ainsi est né le Programme national de mise à la ferraille des véhicules, de marque Retire Your Ride. Contrairement aux États-Unis, le gouvernement canadien a adopté un certain nombre de politiques visant à réduire les émissions des véhicules et, afin de stimuler l’économie, il s’agissait d’un avantage secondaire. Le résultat a été le programme national de mise à la ferraille des véhicules appelé « Retire Your Ride ».

The legacy of the Retire Your Ride program has been a long-lasting one. While Federal dollars were no longer devoted to the program, the industry stepped in to play a similar role.

The National Code of Practice was succeeded by the Auto Recyclers of Canada-led Canadian Auto Recyclers Environmental Code. The organization also continued to operate the similar Retire Your Ride program on a volunteer basis.

While primarily conceived as a program that would benefit the environment, the policy helped drive new vehicle sales in Canada—something even OEMs began to notice.

By 2010, OEMs began to petition the Government to increase the program— which had an initial budget of less than $100 million—and offer far larger incentives to participants. When the governing Tories resisted this, the OEMs changed their strategy. In fact, even before the program became voluntary, General Motors, Hyundai, Ford and Chrysler began to provide new vehicle rebate incentives to drivers who participated. In general terms, the Canadian approach to vehicle scrappage was an unqualified success. The USA’s effort, called Cash For Clunkers and officially known as the Car Allowance Rebate System, was—on paper—a bit like the Canadian program, but was also hastily put together.

With a budget of $3 billion U.S. and offering vehicle rebates of up to $4,500 for recycling certain models, the American model burned through its cash in a few weekends.

Its high profile also served to make the program a magnet for abuse—and bad press.

Due to the artificial value placed on otherwise worthless vehicles, stories of unrecycled vehicles being resold with illegally altered VINs began to appear in news reports. While this spurred the U.S. Government to create a searchable database of VIN numbers, the program’s reputation would not recover. In the aftermath of the program, its overall legacy was also tarnished by academics. One widely cited article that appeared in the journal Economics Quarterly, is often considered to be the last word on the program’s overall performance.

The USA’s effort, called Cash For Clunkers and officially known as the Car Allowance Rebate System, was—on paper—a bit like the Canadian program, but was hastily put together.

L’effort des États-Unis, appelé Cash For Clunkers et officiellement connu sous le nom de Car Allowance Rebate System, était sur le papier – un peu comme le programme canadien, mais il a été mis en place à la hâte.

WHILE THE CONTINUED EXISTENCE OF THE RETIRE YOUR RIDE PROGRAM STANDS AS A TESTAMENT TO THE STRENGTH OF SUCH A WELL-DESIGNED ALTERNATIVE APPROACH, IT REMAINS TO BE SEEN IF CANADIAN POLITICIANS WILL ONCE AGAIN CONSIDER FUNDING SUCH A PLAN DUE TO ITS ASSOCIATION WITH CASH FOR CLUNKERS.

In, The Effects of Fiscal Stimulus: Evidence from the 2009 Cash for Clunkers Program, authors Atif Mian and Amir Sufi argued that, despite spurring a spike in vehicle sales during the length of the program, the lasting effect on vehicles sold was negligible.

“In the subsequent 10 months after the program (September 2009–June 2010), high-clunker cities purchased significantly fewer automobiles than low-clunker cities. By the end of June 2010, one year after the program, the cumulative purchases of high- and low-clunker cities from July 2009 to June 2010 were almost the same,” wrote academics Atif Mian and Amir Sufi.

While this may be a damning indictment of the U.S.’s approach, what is frequently forgotten is that, while Mian and Sufi concluded that the program itself was not a great success, they stop far short of saying all vehicle scrappage incentivization programs are likely to have similar results.

“Furthermore, our findings on the reversal of the CARS program may not apply to other forms of government stimulus. It is conceivable that alternatively designed stimulus programs (e.g., extending unemployment benefits) have different implications for the economy.”

While the continued existence of the Retire Your Ride program stands as a testament to the strength of such a well-designed alternative approach, it remains to be seen if Canadian politicians will once again consider funding such a plan due to its association with Cash for Clunkers.

Should they have the courage to once again support a Federal Government- funded scrappage program, however, they will be pleasantly surprised. The program infrastructure that the Canadian Government helped develop almost a decade ago to make the program a success in 2009 still exists–and still works effectively.

If vehicle scrappage programs are under review, decision-makers should look no further than the successful Canadian Retire Your Ride Program.

Le gouvernement peut améliorer à la fois l’industrie et l’environnement

Avec le lent retour à la vie normale après des mois d’isolement social, les politiciens américains et canadiens vont bientôt tourner la tête vers un autre problème: une économie atone. Il reste à voir quel rôle le marché secondaire de l’automobile jouera à cet égard. Pour prendre leurs décisions politiques, les législateurs devraient se tourner vers les livres d’histoire. Il faut espérer que, dans leurs études, ils prêtent attention aux différentes approches adoptées par les gouvernements américain et canadien dans leurs efforts à utiliser le secteur du recyclage automobile pour aider à relancer l’économie lors de son dernier bouleversement majeur.

Au cours du dernier ralentissement économique majeur dans le monde, les États-Unis ont élaboré des politiques destinées à encourager la mise au rebut des véhicules plus anciens. L’approche versait des primes massives à quiconque souhaitait acheter un nouveau véhicule et n’était pas trop préoccupé par ce qui était arrivé à l’ancien véhicule qui avait été remis. En revanche, le gouvernement canadien a adopté un certain nombre de politiques visant à réduire les émissions des véhicules et si cela arrivait à stimuler l’économie, c’était un avantage secondaire. Ainsi est né le programme national de mise à la casse des véhicules, sous la marque Retire Your Ride.

Le programme canadien versait une prime modeste aux conducteurs qui vendaient des véhicules fonctionnels et plus anciens à des recycleurs automobiles accrédités. À sa fin en 2011, plus de 100 000 véhicules plus anciens et nuisibles à l’environnement avaient été retirés des routes du Canada – bien plus que même les prévisions les plus optimistes du gouvernement. Bien entendu, le programme a également accéléré la transformation de l’industrie canadienne du recyclage automobile, qui était passée d’une industrie désorganisée aux normes et pratiques extrêmement variées, au secteur plus professionnalisé qu’il est aujourd’hui. Seuls les recycleurs formés et audités ont bénéficié du programme pendant son exécution. L’héritage du programme Retire Your Ride est durable. Alors que les dollars fédéraux n’étaient plus consacrés au programme, l’industrie est intervenue pour jouer un rôle similaire.

Le Code de pratique national a été remplacé par le Code environnemental des recycleurs d’automobiles du Canada, dirigé par les recycleurs automobiles du Canada. L’organisation a également continué à gérer le programme similaire a Retire Your Ride sur une base bénévole.

Bien que conçue principalement comme un programme qui profiterait à l’environnement, la politique a contribué à stimuler les ventes de véhicules neufs au Canada, ce que même les équipementiers ont commencé à remarquer. En 2010, les équipementiers ont commencé à demander au gouvernement d’augmenter le programme – dont le budget initial était inférieur à 100 millions de dollars – et d’offrir des incitations beaucoup plus importantes aux participants. Lorsque les Tories résistent à cela, les OEM ont changé leur stratégie. En fait, avant même que le programme ne devienne volontaire, General Motors, Hyundai, Ford et Chrysler ont commencé à offrir des rabais sur les véhicules neufs aux conducteurs qui y ont participé.

En termes généraux, l’approche canadienne de la mise à la casse des véhicules a été un succès sans réserve. L’effort des États-Unis, appelé Cash For Clunkers et officiellement connu sous le nom de Car Allowance Rebate System, ressemblait – sur papier – un peu au programme canadien, mais a également été mis sur pied à la hâte.

Avec un budget de 3 milliards de dollars et offrant des rabais sur les véhicules allant jusqu’à 4500 dollars pour le recyclage de certains modèles, le modèle américain a brûlé sa trésorerie en quelques week-ends. Sa notoriété a également contribué à faire du programme un aimant pour les abus – et la mauvaise presse.

En raison de la valeur artificielle accordée à des véhicules autrement sans valeur, des histoires de véhicules non recyclés revendus avec des VIN illégalement modifiés ont commencé à apparaître dans les reportages. Bien que cela ait incité le gouvernement américain à créer une base de données consultable des numéros de VIN, la réputation du programme ne se rétablissait pas. À la suite du programme, sa réputation globale a également été ternie par les universitaires. Un article largement cité paru dans la revue Economics Quarterly est souvent considéré comme le dernier mot sur la performance globale du programme.

While the continued existence of the Retire Your Ride program stands as a testament to the strength of such a well-designed alternative approach, it remains to be seen if Canadian politicians will once again consider funding such a plan due to its association with Cash for Clunkers.

Si le maintien du programme “Adieu Bazou” témoigne de la force d’une telle approche alternative bien conçue, il reste à voir si les politiciens canadiens envisageront à nouveau de financer un tel plan en raison de son association avec “Cash for Clunkers”

BIEN QUE L’EXISTENCE CONTINUE DU PROGRAMME RETIRE YOUR RIDE TÉMOIGNE DE LA FORCE D’UNE APPROCHE ALTERNATIVE AUSSI BIEN CONÇUE, IL RESTE À VOIR SI LES POLITICIENS CANADIENS ENVISAGERONT UNE FOIS DE PLUS DE FINANCER UN TEL PLAN EN RAISON DE SON ASSOCIATION AVEC CASH FOR CLUNKERS.

Dans The Effects of Fiscal Stimulus: Evidence from the 2009 Cash for Clunkers Program, les auteurs Atif Mian et Amir Sufi ont fait valoir que, malgré une augmentation des ventes de véhicules pendant la durée du programme, l’effet durable sur les véhicules vendus était négligeable.

«Au cours des 10 mois qui ont suivi le programme (septembre 2009 – juin 2010), les villes “High-clunker” ont acheté beaucoup moins d’automobiles que les villes “low-clunker”. À la fin de juin 2010, un an après le programme, les achats cumulés de villes “High-clunker” et “Low-clunker” de juillet 2009 à juin 2010 étaient presque les mêmes », ont écrit les universitaires Atif Mian et Amir Sufi.

Bien que cela puisse être une mise en accusation accablante de l’approche américaine, ce que l’on oublie souvent, c’est que, bien que Mian et Sufi aient conclu que le programme lui-même n’était pas un grand succès, ils s’arrêtent bien avant de dire que tous les programmes d’incitation à la casse de véhicules sont susceptibles de ont des résultats similaires.

«De plus, nos conclusions sur le renversement du programme CARS peuvent ne pas s’appliquer à d’autres formes de relance gouvernementale. Il est concevable que des programmes de relance conçus alternativement (par exemple, l’extension des prestations de chômage) aient des implications différentes pour l’économie. »

Bien que l’existence continue du programme Retire Your Ride témoigne de la force d’une approche alternative aussi bien conçue, il reste à voir si les politiciens canadiens envisagent à nouveau de financer un tel plan en raison de son association avec Cash for Clunkers.

S’ils ont le courage de soutenir une fois de plus un programme de mise à la casse financé par le gouvernement fédéral, ils seront agréablement surpris. L’infrastructure du programme que le gouvernement canadien a aidé à développer il y a près de dix ans pour faire du programme un succès en 2009 existe toujours – et fonctionne toujours efficacement.

Si les programmes de mise à la casse des véhicules sont à l’étude, les décideurs ne devraient pas chercher plus loin que le programme canadien Retire your ride.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *