FOLLOW US

Woodbeck’s Wisdom – La sagesse deWoodbeck

By/Par Steve Fletcher

Bruce Woodbeck has an enviable track in the auto recycling world. By instinct, the industry veteran seeks out opportunities to stay current. It is also in his nature to provide leadership and help build a future – to better himself and the industry he loves.

“It is a great business with many pitfalls but is so rewarding when you work on the business, not ‘in’ the business. I have met some of the most gracious and savvy persons in the world.”

Woodbeck Auto Parts (Stirling) originated as the dream of one man in 1939. Then called Stirling Auto Wreckers, Burton Woodbeck started the business on two acres of land in the downtown area of Stirling, Ontario. The business prospered and necessitated the purchase of an adjoining three acres of land for the incoming inventory.

In 1964, Burton sold his business to his eldest son Ronald, who purchased an eighty acre farm, the present location, for further expansion. Ron ran the business for 12 years from the Stirling location. In 1976 he constructed a Quonset type building and moved the complete business to the farm, approximately one mile north of Stirling.

“When Burton started out, things were much simpler. Vehicles were not as complex and people not so fussy. So the engine burns oil—so what? It’s a great motor, and has never failed to start. Trades people could and would fix things. Auctions were around but the majority of insurance claims managers wanted a face and a name to deal with. Your reputation meant everything.” In 1978 Ron sold his business to his younger brother Bruce. Bruce had attended Brock University for Business Administration and had also obtained his Class A mechanics license. At the time of purchase he was teaching Automotive Apprentices at Loyalist College in Belleville.

Bruce began operations out of the Quonset building and soon after added an additional 40 feet to act as a warehouse.

Bruce managed to acquire three insurance salvage contracts and shortly after joined the Canadian Automotive Recyclers (CAR) long line voice system, a progressive group of auto recyclers buying and selling over what today would be considered a 24/7 conference call. Modern communication technology has always been something Woodbeck has embraced. Digital inventory systems were implemented to keep track of cars, parts and profits. Eventually the inventory focused on quality, guaranteed recycled parts. The business was remodeled to recycle basically late model vehicles of all makes.

“WHEN BURTON STARTED OUT, THINGS WERE MUCH SIMPLER. VEHICLES WERE NOT AS COMPLEX AND PEOPLE NOT SO FUSSY. SO THE ENGINE BURNS OIL— SO WHAT? IT’S A GREAT MOTOR, AND HAS NEVER FAILED TO START. TRADES PEOPLE COULD, AND WOULD, FIX THINGS… YOUR REPUTATION MEANT EVERYTHING.” – BRUCE WOODBECK

In October of 1981 Woodbeck Auto Parts moved into the present showroom and warehouse. Today that building is 1,200 sq m (11,000 sq ft) with a full basement under an addition. There is also another 300 sq m (3,000 sq ft) warehouse to store high-demand parts.

In 1981, Bruce started down the path of heavy involvement with associations, first on the Executive of CAR, the Roadrunner (a dedicated shipping system among CAR Members), and then the Ontario Automotive Recyclers Association (OARA).

“I think all of these associations I have been involved with have benefited Woodbeck Auto Parts, and I hope Woodbeck’s have benefit.” A second parts locating group was formed based on satellite communication technology – state of the art at the time, so Woodbeck’s joined SOAR to allow access to even more product.

CAR and SOAR amalgamated to form OARA in 1992 and Bruce ran for the executive and worked his way up to President.

“I am very proud to be able to say that in my 42 years in this business that I helped bring the Mercury Switch removal program to Canada; negotiated huge reductions in WSIB rates for auto recyclers from $7.25/100 to $3.91/100; pushed for permit branding in Ontario with stakeholder partners like the UCDA, IBC, OPP, insurance companies, and the MTO; started the long process of bringing licensing with standards back to the industry; represented OARA on the Scrap Tire Task Force after the big Hagersville tire fire; served both CAR and OARA as President and remain on the OARA nominating committee; chaired the Roadrunner committee for several years; and hired a kid named Steve Fletcher in to the industry.”

Bruce is a firm believer in the important role associations can play in improving the position of the industry and its stakeholders. In fact, he passed down this belief to his son Greg, who followed in his footsteps, and is now the chairperson of OARA.

“Join associations and participate in leadership positions and on committees. There is tremendous gratification of accomplishing what you started out to do. You get recognition for your industry, your business and yourself.” Bruce’s commitment to service did not end with the auto recycling industry. In his spare time he was Fire Chief for the Town of Stirling from 1978 to 2008. “I keep using the ‘I’ but I must never forget that none of it would have been possible without the support of my wife of 50 years—Gail.”

In 2010, the business was sold to the next generation of Woodbeck, Bruce’s son Greg. With 15 employees, 150,000 parts in stock, Woodbeck Auto Parts is poised to take on the next 80 years, growing, adapting and helping lead the auto recycling world.

“Today, I still enjoy going to the business and seeing all the problems that Greg and his staff face today. I love doing whatever I can to help and really enjoy when asked for my thoughts.”

Un vétéran de l’industrie revient sur sa carrière dans le recyclage automobile

Bruce Woodbeck a un dossier enviable dans le monde du recyclage automobile. Par instinct, le vétéran de l’industrie cherche des occasions de se tenir au courant. Il est également dans sa nature de diriger et d’aider à bâtir un avenir – pour s’améliorer et améliorer l’industrie qu’il aime. «C’est une entreprise formidable avec de nombreux pièges, mais elle est si gratifiante lorsque vous travaillez sur l’entreprise, pas dans l’entreprise. J’ai rencontré des personnes les plus aimables et les plus avisées du monde. Woodbeck Auto Parts (Stirling) est né du rêve d’un homme en 1939. Alors appelé Stirling Auto Wreckers, Burton Woodbeck a lancé l’entreprise sur deux acres de terrain au centre-ville de Stirling, en Ontario. L’entreprise a prospéré et a nécessité l’achat d’un terrain attenant de trois acres pour l’inventaire entrant.

En 1964, Burton a vendu son entreprise à son fils Ronald, qui a acheté une ferme de quatre-vingts acres, l’emplacement actuel, pour une expansion supplémentaire. Ron dirige l’entreprise pendant 12 ans depuis le site de Stirling. En 1976, il a construit un bâtiment de type Quonset et a déménagé l’ensemble de l’entreprise à la ferme, à environ un mile au nord de Stirling. «Lorsque Burton a commencé, les choses étaient beaucoup plus simples. Les véhicules n’étaient pas aussi complexes et les gens pas si difficiles. Alors le moteur brûle de l’huile – et alors? C’est un excellent moteur qui démarre toujours. Les gens de métier pouvaient et voulaient réparer les choses. Les enchères étaient là, mais la majorité des gestionnaires de réclamations d’assurance voulaient un visage et un nom à traiter. Votre réputation signifiait tout. En 1978, Ron a vendu son entreprise à son jeune frère Bruce. Bruce avait fréquenté l’Université Brock pour l’administration des affaires et avait également obtenu sa licence de mécanicien de classe A. Au moment de l’achat, il enseignait aux apprentis automobiles au Loyalist College de Belleville. Bruce a commencé ses opérations à partir du bâtiment Quonset et peu après ajouté 40 pieds supplémentaires pour servir d’entrepôt.

Bruce réussit à acquérir trois contrats d’assurance et s’est joint peu après au système de téléphonie longue ligne de Canadian Automotive Recyclers (CAR), un groupe progressif de recycleurs automobiles achetant et vendant ce qui serait aujourd’hui considéré comme une conférence téléphonique 24/7. Woodbeck a toujours adopté les technologies de communication modernes. Des systèmes d’inventaire numérique ont été mis en oeuvre pour suivre les voitures, les pièces et les bénéfices. Finalement, l’inventaire s’est concentré sur la qualité, des pièces recyclées garanties. L’entreprise a été réaménagée pour recycler essentiellement des modèles récents de véhicules de toutes marques.

«LORSQUE BURTON A COMMENCÉ, LES CHOSES ÉTAIENT BEAUCOUP PLUS SIMPLES. LES VÉHICULES N’ÉTAIENT PAS AUSSI COMPLEXES ET LES GENS PAS SI DIFFICILES. ALORS LE MOTEUR BRÛLE DE L’HUILE – ET ALORS? C’EST UN EXCELLENT MOTEUR QUI N’A JAMAIS MANQUÉ DE DÉMARRER. LES GENS DE MÉTIER POUVAIENT ET VOUDRAIENT RÉGLER LES CHOSES … VOTRE RÉPUTATION ÉTAIT ESSENTIELLE. — BRUCE WOODBECK

En octobre 1981, Woodbeck Auto Parts a emménagé dans la salle d’exposition et l’entrepôt actuels. Aujourd’hui, ce bâtiment mesure 1 200 mètres carrés (11 000 pieds carrés) avec un sous-sol complet en plus. Il y a également un autre entrepôt de 300 mètres carrés (3 000 pieds carrés) pour stocker les pièces à forte demande.

En 1981, Bruce commence à s’engager activement auprès d’associations, d’abord au sein de l’exécutif de la CAR, du Roadrunner (un système d’expédition dédié parmi les membres de la CAR), puis de l’Ontario Automotive Recyclers Association (OARA).

«Je pense que toutes ces associations auxquelles j’ai participé ont profité à Woodbeck Auto Parts, et j’espère que Woodbeck en a profité. Un deuxième groupe de localisation de pièces était formé sur la base des technologies de communication par satellite – à la pointe de la technologie à l’époque, alors Woodbeck a rejoint SOAR pour permettre l’accès à encore plus de produits.

CAR et SOAR ont fusionné pour former OARA en 1992 et Bruce s’est présenté à l’exécutif et a gravi les échelons jusqu’au président. «Je suis très fier de pouvoir dire qu’au cours de mes 42 années dans cette entreprise, j’ai contribué à la mise en place du programme de suppression de Mercury Switch au Canada; négocié d’énormes réductions des tarifs de la CSPAAT pour les recycleurs d’automobiles de 7,25 $ / 100 à 3,91 $ / 100; fait pression pour l’image de marque des permis en Ontario avec des partenaires comme l’UCDA, le BAC, l’OPP, les compagnies d’assurance et le MTO; a commencé le long processus de ramener les licences avec des normes à l’industrie; a représenté OARA au sein du Groupe de travail sur la ferraille après le grand incendie de pneus à Hagersville; a servi à la fois à CAR et à OARA en tant que président et reste membre du comité de nomination de l’OARA; présidé le comité Roadrunner pendant plusieurs années; et a embauché un enfant nommé Steve Fletcher dans l’industrie. »

Bruce croit fermement au rôle important que les associations peuvent jouer pour améliorer la position de l’industrie et de ses parties prenantes. En fait, il a transmis cette croyance à son fils Greg, qui a suivi ses traces et qui est maintenant le président de l’OARA.

«Rejoignez des associations et participez à des postes de direction et à des comités. Il y a une immense gratification à accomplir ce que vous avez commencé à faire. Vous obtenez une reconnaissance pour votre industrie, votre entreprise et vous-même. »

L’engagement de Bruce envers le service n’a pas pris fin avec l’industrie du recyclage automobile. Pendant son temps libre, il a été chef des pompiers de la ville de Stirling de 1978 à 2008.

«Je continue d’utiliser le« je », mais je ne dois jamais oublier que rien de tout cela n’aurait été possible sans le soutien de ma femme depuis 50 ans, Gail.»

En 2010, l’entreprise a été vendue à la prochaine génération de Woodbeck, le fils de Bruce, Greg. Avec 15 employés, 150 000 pièces en stock, Woodbeck Auto Parts est prêt à affronter les 80 prochaines années, à croître, à s’adapter et à aider à diriger le monde du recyclage automobile.

«Aujourd’hui, j’aime toujours aller dans l’entreprise et voir tous les problèmes auxquels Greg et son personnel sont confrontés aujourd’hui. J’adore faire tout ce que je peux pour aider et j’aime vraiment quand on me demande ce que je pense.

Share on facebook
Facebook
Share on google
Google+
Share on twitter
Twitter
Share on linkedin
LinkedIn

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *